Hoors, Women & #AuratMarch

No one minds when maulana sahib is delivering a khutba on ‘Hoors’. Their bodies, figures, curves, shifting from one intercourse to another, having a ‘stamina’ of 70 men and performing to eternity.

No one minds. Regardless of the venue or audience.

For men, the concept of the Hereafter revolves mostly around pretty hoors and sex.

And no one minds. Not even in mosques. Even though the khutbas ignite passion and it’s ‘hard’ to pray later on for ‘sensitive’ men.

Yet. No one minds.

But just when women claim rights to their own bodies – read ‘own bodies’ – things change. Shame emerges. The same numbed-shame, which barely yawns lazily at rapes and abuses and murders and injustices, wakes up.

When people are deaf, an explosion is necessary to make them listen. But when they are dead, nothing can wake them up. Maybe hoors. I don’t know.

Anyway. Let me give you an example. Do you know anything about Prof. Salahuddin of Gomal University? If no, then shame on you for spitting now.
If yes, then shame on you for not spitting as much as you are spitting now.

In 1998, a woman was killed in Kot Addu, Muzaffargarh, when a male member of the family found about her affair. A young girl tried to save her chachi but was also shot dead.
Two women were murdered. Male members of the family forgave each other and things were settled.

In 2019, sister of the murdered young girl had a love marriage. Her family called her home to make peace. She and her 6 month old son, were shot dead. The husband forgave the family and things were settled.

Maybe it would be news for you but incestuous relationships are quite common in waderas and jageers of South Punjab and Sindh, where women are nothing more than wombs.

I can go on and on and on to tell you where women have suffered even after marrying, while men have roamed free even after rapes and murders.

But you don’t mind. Because perhaps, you don’t have one.

Tackle your hypocrisy before teaching religion. Religion isn’t a buffet where you can pick what you want and leave what you don’t like.

Let them speak. Let them share what they have gone through. Debate, if you disagree. But don’t create hurdles.

Don’t play the religion card.

Not here.

Not with me!

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