Rehmu’s Day

Rehmu was on his last tour of the day, carrying bricks from one point to another on his donkey cart. He needed to do at least five such tours a day in order to earn enough for a sufficient meal for him and his family. But today he could only do four and he knew that it would not be enough for his family. He was thinking that either he or his wife would have to pretend not to be hungry that night.

He had known since that morning that he would not have enough work today. His mind had been preoccupied with worries and when the body thinks through the stomach, it creates problems for individuals and hence, societies. But Rehmu was too old and too weak to create problems for the society.

His problem was the fire in the stomach; not the fire in the heart.

Suddenly, he was jolted out of his reverie back to reality. He was lying on the road and the cart had fallen since his donkey had fainted. Oblivious to his own injuries, he rushed towards the cart. Bystanders decided to help him unload the bricks from the cart. Thankfully, the donkey was alive but he had lost consciousness and received a few injuries from the fall.

People around him, the witty analysts they thought themselves to be, laughed and passed remarks at him. An ill-humoured man said,

“O baba ji! Your cart got some dents.”

Another one tried to give him some rational advice,

Baba ji! Don’t overload your cart.”

An apparently religious fellow passing by said,

“You will answer on the Day of Judgment for the way you treat your animals.”

But Rehmu was already worried about his donkey. The donkey might have been the world’s stupidest creature but for Rehmu he was a true companion. He was feeling really sad and heartbroken but he had no other options. He realised that people around him didn’t know about his difficult life and lack of options.

People who think with their brain have a lot of things to worry about – new restaurants, new cars, new movies, new serials, new clothing. But people who are forced to think with their stomachs don’t have many options.

Their world starts and ends with fulfilling the needs of the stomach.

They don’t have to worry about where they sleep and they don’t care about animal rights but do they care for their own rights?

Do they even have rights, these poor donkeys and people like Rehmu?

Are they both equal in the so-called status quo of this world?

What would hell be like for them if this temporary world is so difficult for them?

He helped his donkey to the side and put all the bricks by the side of the road.

What were his options now? He had no other cart to transfer the bricks to the construction point. He didn’t have the modern ‘necessity’ of a cell phone to call for help. And even if he had one, who would he call?

His only option was to feed the donkey, re-load the cart and move on. But did he have the money to feed his donkey?

And more importantly, if he fed his donkey, how would he feed his family?

The harsh reality was that human rights overlapped with animal rights in this cruel world.

He knew people were cursing him as he overloaded the donkey cart yet again but no one helped him or his beloved donkey.

No one really cared about Rehmu’s life.

No one cared that he had to worry about his wife and children before he could think about his donkey.

This post was published on Express Tribune on February 25, 2014.

Done with Blasphemy, Time for Treason

You protest against injustice and you are an activist and want change.

You sit in dharnas to show that the government is based on a corrupt electoral system.

You go on strikes against privatization of public companies.

You protest against the wrong use of blasphemy laws which shows your comprehension and sensibility.

You speak out against killings of minorities, children and women to support peace causes against barbarians.

But if you speak or ask a question about the war on terror, military strategies, military spending, or the intelligence, you are a piece of shit. You are a traitor as you question the very foundation of Pakistan. How dare you?

This is my Pakistan as much as anyone else’s.

I will ask questions when I am dying due to an unknown war, with unknown people, based on unknown money, with unknown motives.

I will ask questions when my General will put me into a situation where murdering women and children is termed as “collateral damage”.

I will protest when I have to kill my own people with my own gun in my own streets.

I have been silenced for far too long.

I remained silent during 1971. I even kept peace when I read the Hamoodur Rahman Commission.

I supported you blindly in the 80s when you created the Taliban and empowered them with weapons for a decade long war against the Soviets.

I ignored your policies in the 90s when you were supporting your Taliban and helping their madrasah system.

Then you started to kill them in 2001.

May I ask what you have achieved in the last 14 years?

I question your capability against people who were empowered by you.

And most importantly I question how you plan to defeat them when they have defeated the Soviet Union, America, and the NATO.

I have a number of serious reservations.

The November 2014 carnage at Wagah Border happened at the third check-post. I want you to punish all the personnel in the first and second check-posts which the bomber crossed easily.

The genocide at Army Public School Peshawar happened in Cantt. There are check-posts on each entry and exit of Cantt. How did the terrorists manage to pass all the hurdles? I want all the culprits hanged along with the terrorists.

There is blood on your weapons. There is blood on your hands. Our weapons have killed children and women in Pakistan. Our bases were given to drones to launch strikes against children and women in Afghanistan.

Who started targeting children first?

It was a military decision to enter into a war which was not ours. Imran Khan was against this notion since the beginning and he was labeled a Taliban sympathizer.

It is time to see the cause rather than continuing to moan about effects. I need you to accept your mistakes. It is time to accept the real reasons that our children are being targeted.

You said that America would destroy Pakistan if we did not support her. Haven’t we self-destructed as a result of this support?

Whether you want to call it treason or any other tag that makes you comfortable; so be it.

My patriotism lies with Pakistan and its people; not with any organization and its personnel.

And Insha Allah, Pakistan will survive; with you or without you.

Come see the Blood in my Streets

I didn’t know my fate would be destined on the leftovers of my father. I saw some of his journals. As I couldn’t read, I burned them. Later on I was charged by a mob with blasphemy. I was burned too. The words in Quran are precious, I know. But my life was precious.  The life of my husband was precious too. There was another life within me which was more precious to us than either our lives.

I didn’t burn Quran. Those who burned me burned the Quran.


I don’t know what came in my mind when I decided to visit the Wagah border ceremony. It happens every day. There are groups of overly enthusiastic patriots standing and chanting on both sides of the border gate. I went to the Wagah border. Then a person helped me cross India, Burma, Malaysia, Philippines, Vietnam, and finally we reached heaven. I am very happy here Alhamdulillah.

I hope all of you find some suicide bomber soon.


I don’t live in DHA, or Cantt, or Bahria Town. I lived in Joseph Colony. Now I don’t live in Joseph Colony. I live in Blasphemy Colony. I am planning to shift to Muslim Town.


I was ugly but I was lucky to find the love of my life. We got married. My father and brother were angry that I married without their consent. They were angry that my sister was not married happily. They called me to Lahore High Court. They killed my outside the court with bricks.

I am happy that I died in the arms of my father and brother. This was a privilege. I always wanted to die among my loved ones. There were hundreds of people who saw me dying. Maybe my life wasn’t worth much but my death was worth innumerable stares and uncountable headlines.


I am a Hindu. No I am a Muslim. No, I am a forced Muslim. I have a husband. He is a Muslim. No, he is a Muslim by choice. He converted me forcefully for my well-being here and in the Hereafter. I don’t know what will happen next but I am sure people around me will force happiness on me.


I am a six year old girl. I didn’t know earlier that I am Shia. So I was kidnapped, tortured, raped, and strangled to death; otherwise I was going to live a sinful life and would make my land impure. I wish they kill my father and mother too so we can be together in the inferno.


I was pronounced a mental patient but he didn’t care. I don’t know what I said that made him angry. I was already in prison. He was supposed to guard me; instead he helped me escape the prison. He opened fire at me. Unfortunately I didn’t die.

When will I die?


She was walking and eating, talking and laughing. She was with family. She was working and everything was going well. But now she is doing nothing. All she sees is blood. She walks on blood. She swims in it. She drinks blood and she loves blood.

She bleeds till there is no blood left in her.

I’m sorry Mr. Jinnah! I pronounce her dead.

Why did the Prophets…?

Like a soul who has a lot of questions and none of the complete answers, I am a meek one. These days the questions which are not letting me sleep are weird. I don’t know why they are coming in my mind and in my nightmares. I don’t qualify for that.

Why Musa A.S. became afraid when Allah transformed his stick into a snake? It was Allah who was talking to him and He said don’t be afraid.

Why Ibrahim A.S. had to fight his Nafs when Allah asked him to sacrifice?

Why the greatest of all the Prophets were confused sometimes when Allah asked them to oblige for some hardest of tasks?

They were Prophets. Talking directly to Allah and getting direct messages. Musa A.S. was the luckiest ones to chat with Allah in the relative time. He usually got his replies right at the moment. Not like some other Prophets who had to wait for the divine reply for weeks or months. But then why he questioned Allah’s orders time to time?

In the mainstream human lives, there comes moment when I see people who didn’t confuse themselves before obliging for Allah. I have even read stories of people who didn’t have to fight their Nafs because they were right on track to oblige and sacrifice. But why Prophets… they were too above… so close to Allah…???

I am a human being… graded to the least bit. I am one of those kinds who ask themselves “Who was it” after having a good or bad dream. Was it devil or a jinn? I have a lot of dimensions to think about after every thought that comes in my mind because I am too ordinary to think extraordinary.

But why did the Prophets…? They were talking directly to The Lord.

Alas! I don’t have a Baba Gee to answer my conflicting questions.

Prelude – Walli’s Life of Parallel Worlds

The newspaper said “200 years ago in 1814, a man named Walli was killed while standing against strict tax regulations by the Company.”
Wrong! I saw that incident and it was me who died. But not for standing against the Company. Anyways…
What if I tell you that I am on my deathbed now in 2014?
And what if I tell you that I have to die once more in 2174 while saving someone from The War? That someone is The One for whom I am travelling through all the times of parallel worlds…

Procrastination and Purpose

I wake up early in the morning, wash myself, have a forced breakfast (better than missing it as my doctor said), then a forced driving to reach office (better than being late or absent as my director said)… hence a day starts… a day which some people can only dream of.

On my 9 to 5 job, I spend time doing the least important things. Listening to rubbish supervisors about things we never do. One hour job surrounded within an eight hour day service. Then I question myself why I procrastinate? What else can I do?

I do read articles on internet on avoiding procrastination just to pass time. Liking and sharing procrastination on social media is a trend. It’s a highly-appreciated hypocrisy today.

Evening is the beautiful part of my day. I drive home and enjoy the sunset in the ugly smoke of traffic on busy roads. By the time I reach home, I am too exhausted to do anything… but then start the priorities of relations. Sometimes I do play football on a nearby ground, and sometimes on Xbox. Other times I do have commitments like appointment of my family members with doctors or dentists, visiting relatives, or something… something which requires driving through the road traffics to reach an un-wanted destination.

There is pursuit to reach destination after reaching destination… another of modern-day-internal-chaos.

By the time I reach bed, there is too much smoke in lungs through burning of both nicotine and oil which makes my head heavy. The same exact day is waiting for me which makes me over-excited to sleep well.

Weekend is another part of self struggle. On weekends, I over-enjoy myself by meeting friends, arguing with them on different macro-economic and political topics, life’s shits, cholesterol, lack of exercise, and similar interesting topics. By sleeping late on weekends, I make my Mondays very struggling. The struggle with eyes and head is so hard that I have to share something bad about Mondays on social media to get likes and similar feelings that we all had an awesome weekend.

But where was the “living” part. I don’t get it.

People say you earn “living” by having a good job, bank accounts, savings, good food, happy family, nice car, and house. But I didn’t meet any “living” standards the entire week, month or a year. How can I live with all these commitments around me?

So many commitments and so much procrastination.

Making excuses with friends and family members of hectic routine, while always finding something to pass time… thanks to smartphones and 3G.

Life is highly overrated. If this is the life, then we have to re-think and re-evaluate. Living is totally missing in these living standards. Saving holidays for future which never comes. Avoiding absents to avoid what? Always dreaming of holidays on peaceful mountains but never trying for peace. Always trying to buy expensive materials to impress all expect ourselves, but never trying to buy a cheap peaceful home in north. Why all our priorities are against living and for chaos? Why not internal peace?


The “I” World & Sufi Entrepreneurship

We have divided our lives into disconnected moods, feelings and formats which make it very tough for us to define ourselves. Sometimes while driving or sitting idly, we do think who we are actually? Am I the one sitting in the office working on business analysis, career development and money making? Or am I the one who listens to pop songs and starts jumping? Or am I the one who gets sad while listening to ghazals of Faiz Ahmad Faiz and Habib Jalib? Or the one who reads Sufism and gets deep into my own world of seven continents and four oceans? Who is the real “I”?

We are born to act in different ways in different scenarios. We have to behave and be modest with our parents, as it is ethically and religiously right. We have to be more frank and more interactive among friends so that the whole gathering can enjoy with us. We have to be sad and supportive during funerals while happy during happy events of people around us. Our behavior must have to change in accordance with the situation. It is what we are supposed to do in society. But what about the inner “I”?

Why we enjoy pop songs and gets sad on ghazals? Are we bad listeners!

Why do we have an ultimate feeling while reading one good book, and then next good book (entirely different from the previous one) changes the whole previous aura? Are we bad readers!

One has to leave “I” outside the door of Sufism and spiritualism. “I” has to be left in Islam, Buddhism and other spiritual domains of almost all the religions in the world. We live in an “I” world when others are dependent on us in organizations, offices, games, gatherings, etc. Similarly we try to be in the “us” world when we are dependent on others or want to show association with certain groups.

Sufism is humbleness, knowing oneself, unleashing the “I”, exploring internally and externally, and letting us know ourselves. We can have the same aura within the inside and outside world while anywhere. Sufism and spiritualism are not separated from our working lives. With Sufi approaches, we can have better success in our careers.

A  Sufi Entrepreneur will not focus on his goals but the overall goals of the organization. He will focus on the needs and wants of others, will not insult or embarrass anyone, will go on ethical business means, and will try his level best for win-win situations of everyone. He will earn money, will try to earn more fortune, but will remain within approaches of Sufism. Sufism can be the soul of a successful business. One who listens to Sufi poetry frequently and uses unfair means in business and career development, is perhaps a hypocrite.

Sufi business and Sufi entrepreneurship are related in the modern world today. We should be the firm-one internally regardless of the external set-up. We have to be the same person internally regardless of an external situation. We need to be emotionally stable. As said, a good person is not the one who is good with you at a restaurant, but the one who is good with everyone including the waiters.

Our business education system has to introduce Sufi and Spiritual approaches. The current focus is on career development and making money which is generating humanistic machines running for same materialistic goals in life. Colleges and Universities are hub where one learns about himself. They should remain such hubs of internal prestige where students are taught with a less materialistic (if possible) and more spiritualistic lessons. We need Sufi entrepreneurs in the modern world to end hunger and poverty all over the world.

We need to learn more of the “I” world than the outside world. 


Book Review: After the Prophet: The Epic Story of the Shia-Sunni Split in Islam by Lesley Hazleton



Lesley Hazleton published a book named “After the Prophet: The Epic Story of the Shia-Sunni Split in Islam”. The book has focused on Sunni and Shia versions of the incidents on which there are differences among Muslims. But the main focus of the book can simply be seen as hate, which is evident throughout, along with biased opinions in the end. She has mentioned Quran as Word of God because of its beauty and divine message. She has also mentioned Prophet Muhammad PBUH as literally the Prophet from God because of the divine revelation of Quran on Him. It is highly regarded however I couldn’t understand is as she mentions herself as “Agnostic Jew” in a Ted Talk on Quran.

But apart from that, her study on Islam while writing on it was more than poor on various Islamic laws. She mentioned in Chapter 3 of the book:

For a wronged woman, there could have been no better outcome, yet the form of it would be cruelly turned around and used by conservative clerics in centuries to come to do the opposite of what Muhammad had originally intended: not to exonerate a woman but to blame her. The wording of his revelation would apply not only when adultery was suspected but also when there had been an accusation of rape. Unless a woman could produce four witnesses to her rate – a virtual impossibility – she would be considered guilty of slander and adultery, and punished accordingly. Aisha’s exoneration was destined to become the basis for the silencing, humiliation, and even execution of countless women after her.”

Here, like most of other Western authors, Lesley Hazelton has presented her weak knowledge and lack of study before writing the book. To come up with four witnesses is only in case of adultery or fornication. There is nothing like to present four witnesses when someone is raped. Some clerics in Muslim world, and recently in Dubai, have done as what Lesley Hazelton has mentioned, but these clerics and countries are not Islam. Islam is not what we are. Islam is Quran and Sunnah; and to judge Islam, one has to study Quran and Sunnah, not us.

The whole boot is written without citations and endnotes, making it more vulnerable. However the book is written in a balanced way like;

  • To praise the dimensions where Sunnis and Shias have no conflict.
  • To defame the dimensions where there are conflicts. The book is meant to present the differences, but not the hate and biased views.

Mood of the author also seemed to change frequently. On some stages it is felt as the author is angry with Islam, and on other sides her mind is blown away on the remarkable early successes. She is confused in certain areas, and makes this similar effect on the reader. But still, the overall book is a piece of knowledge. People who want to learn more can read Al-Tabari from where she has gathered material for her book mainly, however her personal opinions have ruined the tastes in various places, as well as made some beautiful points as well.

While presenting history, authors should be careful. At least they should be honest as a researcher, as well as a writer. They have the right to opinionate certain aspects, but they should have thorough grip.

In the end of the book, there are some current political scenarios mentioned by the author, which are strongly mentioned. These are lessons, messages and things to remember for Muslims. Some of these fragments are as follow;

Whatever balance there was would be changed utterly by World War I and the consequent partitioning of the former Ottoman Empire. Western intervention reshaped the Middle East, often in what seems astonishingly cavalier fashion. The British enabled the Wahhabi-Saudi takeover of Arabia, installed a foreign Sunni king over Shia majority Iraq, and shored up the Nazi sympathizer Reza Khan as Shah of Iran. After World War II, the United States took over as prime mover. Motivated by Cold War ideology, it helped engineer a coup d’état against Iran’s newly elected prime minister Muhammad Mossadegh and reinstated the autocratic regime of Reza Khan’s son, Shah Reza Pahlavi, under whom Iran first aspired to nuclear power—with American encouragement. Successive U.S. administrations backed the Wahhabi-dominated kingdom of Saudi Arabia not only for access to its oil but also as a bulwark against Nasser’s pro-Soviet regime across the Red Sea in Egypt. In the 1980s the United States joined forces with Saudi Arabia and Pakistan to fund the anti- Soviet mujahidin—literally jihad fighters, or as Ronald Reagan preferred to call them, freedom fighters—in Afghanistan, and in a rather stunning example of unintended consequences, these troops later formed the basis of the Taliban. In that same decade, the United States found itself arming both sides in the Iran-Iraq War, supporting Saddam Hussein in order to counter the fierce anti-Americanism of post revolutionary Iran, while also supplying Iran in the murky “arms for hostages” Iran-Contra affair.

Sunni and Shia radicals alike called on a potent blend of the seventh century and the twentieth: on the Karbala story and on anti-Westernism. By the 1980s such calls were a clear danger signal to the pro-American Saudis, who were highly aware that radical Sunni energies could come home to roost in an Arabian equivalent of the Iranian Revolution. Their answer, in effect, was to deal with radical Islamism by financing it abroad, thus deflecting its impact at home. The Saudis became major exporters of Wahhabi extremism and its bitterly anti-Shia stance, from Africa to Indonesia, countering a newly strengthened sense of Shia identity and power—“the Shia revival,” as it’s been called—energized by the Iranian Revolution. The Sunni-Shia split had again become as politicized as when it began.

 As the United States has at last recognized, with thousands of American troops killed in Iraq and Afghanistan, Westerners enter such a power struggle at their own peril, all the more since many in the Middle East suspect that Western powers have deliberately manipulated the Shia-Sunni split all along in order to serve their own interests. The chaos unleashed by the invasion of Iraq in 2003 may have resulted in yet another unintended consequence in American eyes, but it was not so unintended in Iraqi eyes. “The invader has separated us,” declared Muqtada al-Sadr in 2007. “Unity is power, and division is weakness.”

The Karbala story has endured and strengthened not least because it reaches deep into questions of  morality—of idealism versus pragmatism, purity versus compromise. Its DNA is the very stuff that tests both politics and faith and animates the vast and often terrifying arena in which the two intersect. But whether sacredness inheres in the Prophet’s blood family, as the Shia believe, or in the community as a whole, as Sunnis believe, nobody in the West should forget that what unites the two main branches of Islam is far greater that what divides them, and that the vast majority of all Muslims still cherish the ideal of unity preached by Muhammad himself —an ideal the more deeply held for being so deeply broken.


And We All Shine On!

When All India Muslim League lost Indian Provincial Elections of 1937, they didn’t lose faith in Jinnah or the league. It was blow on their movement and ideology but they didn’t adopt violent or abusive approach. They accepted the results without complaining about anything, and re-started their homework. In 1940, they had a remarkable Lahore Resolution which set their momentum again, better than before. In 1946, they won 425 seats out of 496 in Constituent Assembly Elections and made a decisive blow on Congress and British Raj.

I don’t want to compare PTI with AIML (All India Muslim League). There is no such intention because there are differences… of time, leadership, momentum, approach, attitude, and acceptance of reality. What PTI is doing after Elections of 2013 is not what AIML had done after Elections of 1937. But this is from where we can learn.

First of all I congratulate PML-N for having a victory in the National Assembly. They have done some homework and were well above in some domains than PTI. For example Nawaz Sharif was way more humble than Imran Khan throughout the campaigns. Similarly, followers of Nawaz Sharif were not as aggressive and intolerant as of PTI followers.

Secondly, PML-N has won, but this does not mean that PTI has lost. PTI has won in majority in KPK and have made their significant impact in Punjab. They were able to get millions of votes throughout Punjab which means they can get more by doing better work in future. Similarly, now they have a practical chance to prove themselves as the best ones by making KPK as an exemplary province of Pakistan.

Thirdly, there is a world outside Facebook and Twitter which is not entirely supportive of the views of PTI. There are villages and backward areas where no one knows about Tabdeeli and Naya Pakistan. Social media is a good approach to work on, but to “clean sweep” there is a significant need to work all over Pakistan… not only major cities and virtual media.

I hope Pakistan will get better in coming 5 years and will prove to be a growing economy. I wanted Imran Khan to be the Prime Minister of Pakistan, not Nawaz Sharif, but now we all should respect the mandate. If I will hope that Pakistan will see that they have made a wrong decision on electing PML-N, then this hope would be on Pakistan’s expense… which is against the ideology of PTI too. We all should hope and work for the growth of Pakistan regardless of the government, and meanwhile we can improve and prove ourselves to be the most competent ones by 2018. Allah has given a chance to PTI in KPK, if not in Pakistan. Now is the time to prove with a blow and let PML-N work federally with best of intentions for the people of Pakistan.

Imran Khan should come forward. He should tell the followers to keep calm and accept the results (which he has done already but not very clearly). There is no need to accept defeat as there is none. It is victory from various angles. All we need to do is change our dimension mentally and attitude practically.

There is no more ANP, APML and PML-Q. People have proved that they don’t trust PPP either. Separatist have lost their seats in Baluchistan. KPK has given their mandate for change and better governance. Sindh has risen against MQM. Punjab has accepted PML-N in the majority and has criticized them where they tried to make their influence. Overall, for me, there is a significant change in Pakistan and people have proven themselves that they can change the destiny of political parties. Now there is a competition between PML-N and PTI. It should remain healthy and PTI should prove itself better than them in all aspects… from behavior to political matters.

Hoping for the best, I accept the results of ECP, except for areas where the majority has come out for re-elections. Overall, the job of ECP was good in the most challenging of the times when terrorism, load shedding, violence, bomb threats, and worse five year tenure was present. Next time, we will be able to have better elections than time In sha Allah.

It’s all a matter of time… an organic process. We wanted evolution, not revolution… and we are on our way!

Vote for honest parliamentarians!

I am a PML-TI supporter, a party which actually doesn’t exist, but I have a philosophy behind this. I want all the great minds of different political parties in the next parliament of Pakistan, great minds like Imran Khan, Shahbaz Sharif, Saad Rafique, Jamshed Dasti, Javed Hashmi, Asad Umar, and many more. But unfortunately, all these guys are fighting against each other. These handfuls of honest people are truly the asset of Pakistan in the current scrap of political parties. If any single party clean sweeps the elections (either PTI or PML-N), then I believe it would be a disaster for Pakistan.

The stage at which Pakistan is today (well it has always been at crucial stage); we cannot afford to have a government comprised of all new, inexperienced and potentially corrupt people. We need loyal and honest representatives in our parliament which can take following bold steps:

• Passing a comprehensive resolution against drone strikes
• Peace resolution with practical steps in Baluchistan and KPK
• Long term strategic relationship with Afghanistan
• End of violence in Karachi through any action (army/non-army)
• Draft Blasphemy Law with consensus
• Rapid movement towards energy generation through non-petroleum means
• Limiting both the dangerous ends of being liberal and extremist
• Focus on free education for all
• Justice for all
• Limiting media channels and banning anti-Pakistan speakers
• Movement towards resolution of Kashmir issue
• Solving water crisis

If there is Hanif Abbasi vs. Imran Khan in your area, vote for Imran Khan. If it is Saad Rafique vs. Hamid Khan, vote for Saad Rafique. Do not support a party which is a mixture of corrupt and honest people, but support honest men only. Honest parliamentarians are way better than a mixture of honest and corrupt parliamentarians.

In my area, it was expected initially that Hamayun Akhtar Khan will contest from PML-N, in which case I was determined to vote against him as he supported military dictatorship. He was highly ineffective in doing any progressive effort during his time in Musharraf’s era. Later on came the name of Saad Rafique, who is not only loved within his own party but also by his opponents. Imran Khan has praised him in his book “Pakistan: A Personal Hisotry” with good words for his political character and anti-dictatorial stance against Pervez Musharraf.

Let’s all vow that we will vote for honest guys only. In the end, we have to answer about our votes in afterlife, so why not being reasonable about it as well. Let’s go for a win-win situation and be satisfied with our voting. We, the people, cannot make a good political party; but together can shape a good parliament.

In the end, prays are for Pakistan that may Allah guide us on the right track of prosperity, development, peace, and growth.